jeannejacobysmith

My Heart I Give …


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PET MO-Columbia update 4-26-16 PETs built to date since 1-1-16 #517 When I pull into my parking space at PET there is, in front of my pickup, a Peace Pole. We planted it several years ago in a special ceremony involving the Columbia Chamber of Commerce. My goal then was to spark a movement to […]

via Is PET a “machine of peace”? — A Gift of Mobility… The PET® Mobility Project

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Seun Oke at 2014 PET Annual Conference

Seun Oke from Nigeria came to the US earlier this fall. She was scheduled at several PET shops around the US to talk about receiving her PET wheelchair and how it made a difference in her mobility. Today, she’s engaged to be married and holds an office job, both of which she attributes to her ability to use the PET. I was impressed listening to her. She, also, has a neat sense of humor. Listen to her story for yourself on You-tube here. You will be amazed.

Mobility Worldwide®

produced by Arla Gabrielse

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PET: What if we took it seriously?

This is Seun Oke from Nigeria. A few years ago, she received a PET wheelchair. The film below is an example of how a PET can transform a life. Currently, this young lady has completed two years of college in her PET, and she is engaged to be married. Not a bad track record for one who was considered helpless just a few years ago.
I might add that there are more than 20 PET shops in the U.S., plus another in Zambia, Africa. The one near us is PET-Kansas. It’s an empowering vehicle for the poor, and it gives them a chance at life. Enjoy!

Mobility Worldwide®

PET UPDATE: 11-25-14 Built since 1-1-14 1292

What if we took it seriously? A week ago I was in Nicaragua with Rainbow
Network, and representing PET. After leaving the asphalt road and traveling
in low gear by washed out bridges and at walking speed in a 4-wheel drive
pickup, we arrived at a local health clinic where Rainbow’s doctor was
treating the half-day’s list of 20 patients. In due time we were introduced
to a mother and her son, Leni. Leni looks to be 4 years old but is probably
6. He is a victim of Down’s Syndrome, and had been discovered hidden away in
a back corner of his mud-stick home when Rainbow did its recent census of
all the 45,000+- persons in its area of work. He cannot walk and his hands
could not crank a PET, so we had the privilege of seeing this young man
“come…

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Yes, You Can Do It!

I grew up in a cabinet maker’s family. Dad was so good that his family’s business,  Jacoby’s Furniture Factory, did repair work for President Eisenhower’s farm near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. I helped my Dad in his shop when I grew up so had a comfort zone with tools.

Twenty five years later, after I was married and had a family, I decided to knock a wall out to enlarge our living room while my husband was traveling in Europe. Before he left, I told him what I was thinking. He didn’t believe I could do it and discouraged me, I believe, because he is a scholar and has no skills in woodworking.

So … on the sly, I bought the tools and hid them until he left – a rotary saw, small table saw, drills, an electric sander, and so on. The first few days, I studied the manuals for safety. Then I went to the lumberyard and purchased the materials needed. With a professional’s help, I proceeded to knock out a wall and enlarged our living room. That made it half again as big and provided space for an office area. I used the extra week building ceiling to floor bookshelves to accommodate our many books since we are both college teachers.

A few weeks later, when my husband came home, he was stunned. In the years since then, he has brought students, colleagues, and friends to the house to show off the results of my labor.

If you have a hankering to do carpentry work, by all means, DO IT! Pick professional carpenters’ brains, get books for beginners and read them, and take a course on safety at your local vo-tech or junior college. Try smaller projects first, and then move on. Learn all you can so you do it right.  Have fun!


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100 Years Later – Pippa Still Passes

jeannejacobysmith

by Jeanne Jacoby Smith

“God’s in His Heaven …
All’s right with the world!” 
Trilled the girl child Pippa
On the one day per diem
She was frees from her slavery.

A century past Pippa,
Child labor hidden,
Justice confounding,
Children not whole.
Browning’s red-hot brand
sears our conscience
– and soul!

NOTE: Robert Browning, a celebrated Victorian poet, penned a poem called “Pippa Passes.” His poem deals with a girl child who worked in a sweatshop, day in and day out, year after year.  Each year, Pippa had one day off from work  – New Year’s Day.  Other than those few blessed hours, the only world this girl child knew was one of modern-day slavery.  She had no other reality.
The irony here is that in Browning’s poem, on New Year’s Day, her only day off that year, in her innocence she was singing, “God’s in His Heaven…

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100 Years Later – Pippa Still Passes

by Jeanne Jacoby Smith

“God’s in His Heaven …
All’s right with the world!” 
Trilled the girl child Pippa
On the one day per diem
She was frees from her slavery.

A century past Pippa,
Child labor hidden,
Justice confounding,
Children not whole.
Browning’s red-hot brand
sears our conscience
– and soul!

NOTE: Robert Browning, a celebrated Victorian poet, penned a poem called “Pippa Passes.” His poem deals with a girl child who worked in a sweatshop, day in and day out, year after year.  Each year, Pippa had one day off from work  – New Year’s Day.  Other than those few blessed hours, the only world this girl child knew was one of modern-day slavery.  She had no other reality.
The irony here is that in Browning’s poem, on New Year’s Day, her only day off that year, in her innocence she was singing, “God’s in His Heaven; All’s right with the world.”
Pippa is, obviously, happy for her time off, but, tragically, the reader knows (and we know) that for the next 364 days, little Pippa will be slaving at her machine again., day in and day out, ad infinitum.
One cannot read this poem without experiencing what Wordsworth called “the overflow of powerful feelings,” only in this case, Pippa has no frame of reference for freedom or what a real childhood might look like. Thus, she interprets this day as her ‘moment in heaven,’ even though the rest of the year for her is hell.
Pippa’s reality impels us to work on behalf of justice, freeing child slaves like her.  Her story melts my heart.